• Bibliographical Control

    Bibliographical Control It means the adequate listing of records of knowledge in all forms, including published as well as unpublished documents. There should be an effective access to information about documents in the subject by providing systematic bibliographies. Bibliographical control deals with the whole range of bibliographies consisting of comprehensive, elective, current and retrospective ones. These different bibliographies should complement each other so that they…

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  • Bibliography

    Bibliography is a systematic description and history of books, their authorship, publication, editions (Oxford English Dictionary). It is a list of books of a particular author, printer or country, or those dealing with any particular theme, i.e. the literature of a subject. Bibliography is the study of books as material objects, irrespective of their contents. A bibliography may include a detailed description of the books…

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  • BarCode

    A set of parallel lines of varied thicknesses and space on products sold in supermarkets. The lines represent alphanumerical characters which can be recognized and interpreted by an optical scanner. The code represented by bars is known as Universal Product Code. It is specially designed label consisting of closely spaced lines of varying widths which is used to encode a numeric identifier. A typical bar…

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  • Organization of Cataloging Entries

    In a catalogue, individual bibliographic entries are organized into a coherent file. Two predominant methods of organizing the entries are the systematic or classified arrangement and the alphabetical arrangement. In a classified catalogue, the entries are arranged according to a certain system of classification, resulting in subject collocation. This is the older form of catalog arrangement. This form of catalog as a public tool has…

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  • Main Entry

    Main Entry Among the entries or access points assigned to a catalog record, one is designated as the main entry. The other access points are called added entries. The record that bears the main entry represents a complete catalog record of the item and is presented in the form by which the item is to be uniformly identified and cited. In recent year, the concept…

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  • Cataloguing Access Point

    Access Point: Each bibliographic record is given one or more access points through which the record can be retrieved. For a cataloging record, an access point is presented in the form of a heading added to the description. Each heading applied to a record then results in a catalog entry. The basis for the access point may be the subject content of the work. In…

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  • Cutter’s rules of Cataloguing

    Charles Cutter (1837-1903) was another pioneering librarian. One part of his large body of work was Rules for a Printed Dictionary Catalog (1876, with several revisions), which “became the basis for the dictionary catalog, which was to become the predominant form of catalogs in general libraries in the United States” (Chan 34). Cutter (8) elegantly set out what a catalogue should do, and how: 2.To…

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  • British Museum’s Cataloguing Rules

    Sir Anthony Panizzi (1787-1879) was a pioneering English librarian whose 91 rules for the British Museum’s catalogue, “Rules for the Compilation of the Catalogue”, are “considered to be the first major cataloguing code” (Chan 34). There is not room to go into all of Panizzi’s work or the Royal Commission that examined it, but a statement Panizzi made to the Commission is perfectly valid 160…

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  • ALA 1949 Cataloguing Code (ALA-49)

    Since the Library of Congress was revising its rules for description, the American Library Association decided to omit that portion of the rules from the 1941 draft and include only the rules for entry and heading in the ALA rules. This decision was made partly because individual libraries had been following LC practice (owing to the availability of LC printed cards) and partly because that…

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  • Library Networking

    Library Networking: Knowledge and information is the fountain heads of all round human development. Hence, it is necessary to share and communicate this information. Resource sharing has become a central focus of interest to the librarians and information professionals. The terms such as, network, consortium and co-operatives have been used to label the organizational arrangements for achieving a variety of resource sharing objectives. The developments…

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